Meet Our 2017 Pushcart Nominees

We at The Tishman Review are proud to announce our nominees for this year’s Pushcart Prize. Because we are huge fans of all the work we publish in our journal, it is always a challenge narrowing down our list of potential nominees. However, we believe the writers listed below represent some of the finest work we’ve published this year.

Keep reading to learn more about these promising writers!

Emma Wunsch

emma wunschEmma Wunsch was nominated for her short story “Looking for Cat Stevens,” which appeared in our July issue this year. Emma has an MFA from Brooklyn College and is the author of the young adult novel The Movie Version.  Her short stories have been published in a variety of journals including Passages North, The Best of the Bellevue Review, Lit, J Journal, and The Brooklyn Review. She lives and works in New Hampshire with her family. Her website is, and she’s on Twitter @emmawunsch.

Who was the first person you told about your nomination?

All of the people in my house had already gone to bed so the first person I told about my nomination was my dog Ruby. She was sleeping on the couch, but I gave her a pet and said, “My story got nominated for a prize!” In the fictionalized account, she would’ve grumbled that she was offended by the word cat in the title, but in reality she just continued to sleep. 


Alysse Kathleen McCanna

alysseAlysse Kathleen McCanna was nominated for her poem “It’s Not Like the Movies,” which appeared in our January 2017 issue. Alysse is currently pursuing her PhD in English at Oklahoma State University. She is Associate Editor of Pilgrimage Magazine and received her MFA in Writing and Literature from Bennington College in 2015. Her work has appeared in or is forthcoming from, Lunch Ticket, Barrow Street, Boulevard, Midwestern Gothic, and other journals. She lives in Stillwater, OK, where she and her fiancé bask in the heat of the prairie and tend to their growing menagerie.

How did you celebrate your nomination?

 I celebrated my nomination by pouring a glass of wine and then sending out more poems.


Kim Noriega


Kim Noriega was nominated for her poem “Postcard to My Younger Self Beneath the Apple Trees,” which appeared in our January issue. Kim is the author of Name Me published by Fortunate Daughter Press. Her poetry and nonfiction have appeared in journals and anthologies including: American Life in PoetryParis-Atlantic, and Split Lip. She was a finalist for the Edna St. Vincent Millay Poetry Prize and the winner of the San Miguel Literary Sala’s 2017 Flash Writing Contest Nonfiction Prize. Kim lives in San Diego where she heads San Diego Public Library’s family literacy program.

Who was the first person you told about your nomination?

Actually, the first “person” I told that I’d been nominated for a Pushcart Prize was my Calico, Sundari, since she was trying to sit on my keyboard while I was trying to read my email. She was quite excited to hear the news as evidence by her exuberant “Meow!” Or she wanted me to quit reading my email and pay attention to her. Then, I called my husband, who was excited for me too.


Karla Van Vliet

TishmanTenKarlaVanVlietKarla Van Vliet was nominated for her poem “If My Body Were a Country Meadow Edged by a Shadowed Wood,” which appeared in our January issue. Karla is the author of two collections of poems, From the Book of Remembrance and The River From My Mouth, published by Shanti Arts.  She is an Edna St. Vincent Millay Poetry Prize finalist and a Best of the Net nominee. Her poems have appeared in Poet Lore, Green Mountains Review, Cronnog Magazine, and others. Her chapbook Fragments: From the Lost Book of the Bird Spirit is forthcoming from Folded Word. Karla is a co-founder and editor of deLuge Journal. She is an Integrative Dreamwork analyst, artist, and administrator of the New England Young Writers’ Conference at Bread Loaf, Middlebury College. Karla lives in Bristol, Vermont.

What were you doing when you found out you’d been nominated for a Pushcart?

I’m scrolling down through my email inbox, with its 1045 out of 5257 unread messages, highlighting emails to trash. I’m just keeping my head above water here, so many emails from stores I once bought a now forgotten item from but must have been, silver wire, clothing, vitamins, boots, or books. I’m hounded here by the consumerism of my life; it’s not a good look. I want to quickly sweep these reminders under the rug and keep only important emails to peruse at a later time, no time now, really, I’m just putting off sleep.

I notice another kind of email here as well, that’s the one that says it’s from _____ ______, (insert name I might recognize) but upon closer inspection is the DCCC or a nature conservatory writing to tell me the state of the world is bad and if I don’t send money soon all will be lost. So, I’m a little put off, it’s late and I’m about to go to sleep, the end of the world is nearly the last thing I want to hear about. I would, after all, like a good night’s rest.

And then I see the subject line “Re: Pushcart Nominee Announce…” highlighted in messages I’m set to delete, my curser hovering over the little garbage pail. I pause.

I un-highlight the message, open it. At first I don’t understand the leading sentence “We at The Tishman Review are pleased to announce you as our 2017 Pushcart nominees.” I think, “that sentence seems strange.” And then I read “Congratulations!” And it dawns on me, the obvious at this point, I’m one of the nominees! Wow! Wait? What? Wow!

Thank God for pausing, I always say. And for a heart that can switch from grumpy and tired to oh-so-touched as fast as a horse coming around a barrel. Because my heart is full of gratitude and I graciously thank The Tishman Review for their support and the honor to represent them as nominee.


Alysia Nicole Harris

21688398_1845654212118875_774305517422980032_oAlysia Nicole Harris was nominated for her poem “Exegesis” (with a line from Richard Siken), which appeared in our October issue. Alysia is a performance artist, poet, and linguist.  She has performed at the US Embassy and at the United Nations and has toured nationally and internationally for the past eight years.  Alysia has been featured on HBO, Blavity, Shine for Harriet, and Nylon Magazine, and her work has appeared in Best New Poets, Indiana Review, Callaloo, and Solstice Magazine, among others. She lives in Atlanta and serves as managing editor at Scalawag Magazine.


Judith Alexander-McGovern

Judith Alexander-McGovern was nominated for her short story “Death with Dignity,” which appeared in our October 2017 issueJudith’s short stories have been published in Alligator Juniper and The Timberline Review. She has an MA in Latin American Literature and flirted briefly with a PhD in Medieval Spanish Literature before realizing she would someday have to make a living. Succumbing to the siren call of finance, she spent thirty-four years in banking, including stints as a money market trader, portfolio analyst, and regulatory reporting manager. Liberated by retirement, she has returned to a life of the mind. She lives in Seattle with her husband and the untarnished memories of several exceptional cats.

What was your reaction to finding out you were nominated?

My reaction to my nomination mirrors today’s multiple platforms for communication. The first person I told was my husband, who was sitting 20 feet away in the den. Next, I texted my librarian friend in Idaho. A little while later I emailed my youngest son in New York. Not long afterward I told my writing groups, in person and through email. I have, however, managed to refrain from sharing the news with random passersby!

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