Meet Our Best Small Fictions Nominees

We at The Tishman Review are pleased to announce our nominees for the 2019 Best Small Fictions anthology. We are so proud of all our contributors. Keep reading to meet this year’s nominees!

“A Sentinel in the Plains” by Jackie Aleksandrovich |TTR 4.3

JackieAlexanderYannJackie Aleksandrovich lives, writes, and will likely die out in the Northwest. A handful of their work has been published in Thin Air Magazine, OROBORO, and Foglifter Journal.




What is the best piece of writing advice you have received?

The writing advice I’ve found to be most useful is just write, write often. Write as often as you think you possibly can, even the most minute and fleeting thought, see to it that it’s written. Write even if what you think you’re writing is garbage. Just keep writing. You’ll get better.

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“Warp and Weft by Deborah Elderhorst | TTR 4.2

DeborahElderhorst

Deborah Elderhorst is an Australian-Canadian writer of literary fiction and creative nonfiction. Her work has appeared in the anthology Trace (Clover Press-Visible Ink, Australia) and in the New Zealand journal Phantom Billstickers Café Reader. She was a finalist in the Writers’ Union of Canada 25th Annual Short Prose Competition for Emerging Writers and received an honorable mention in the 44th New Millennium Writing Awards. Deborah lives in Toronto, where she works as an editor.

What do you do to overcome writer’s block?

Crossing over from fiction into hybrid forms of nonfiction—lyrical essays, prose poems, visual essays—afforded me a creative jolt when I felt stuck on a project. In granting myself permission to experiment with forms that were new to me, I recovered that sense of playfulness and excitement about writing that often yields the best and most surprising results. I felt like an alchemist. Far from turning me away from fiction permanently, this gave me new energy for my stalled project.

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“In My Pocket” by Seth D. Slater | TTR 4.1

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Seth D. Slater has contributed to the Chicago Quarterly ReviewNew Madrid: Journal of Contemporary LiteratureMetonymLe Scat Noir, and The Tishman Review. Slater was a recent AWP finalist for best novel excerpt and teaches Writing and Rhetoric at San Diego State University.


What does your writing process look like?

There’s nothing like forward motion. I pace or drive my stories into existence, the spirit translating asphalt miles or circled-steps into motion outside myself. After I get the gist, after I tread a cerebral rut that feels out my trajectory of thought, I sit down at my desk and drink heavily-sugared coffee (because I don’t have enough cavities) and I blast music that hand-holds my current tempo of thought.


“And We Who Never Died” by Desmond White |TTR 4.2

Desmond_WhiteDesmond White’s satire and speculative fiction has appeared in HeartWoodGhost ParachuteWhatever Our SoulsRue ScribeInk & VoicesKasmaThe Tishman Review, and others. His piece “House Divided” was recently featured in Z Publishing’s America’s Emerging Writers. A native of California, Des has lived in Indonesia, Venezuela, China, and the “independent Republic” of Texas. He has an MLA from Houston Baptist University, where he founded the student magazine Writ in Water. These days he teaches high school in Colorado and runs a flash-fiction-focused website called Rune Bear. See more at www.desmondwrite.com or @desmondwrite.

Where or what time of day do you write best?

Famously, Ernest Hemingway wrote in the morning from “first light” to noon. For those of us who work the 9 to 5 (as a teacher, 7 to 3), Hemingway might not inspire so much as demotivate. Coming home from a day’s work, with kids and cats and bills, and the brain completely oatmeal—who has the time for anything?

Instead, I draw inspiration from Terry Pratchett, who dreamed of story at work, and wrote four hundred words at home. Every day. Until he finished his novel. So where or when do I find the time? Wherever. Whenever. But I write every day, hopefully at my dining room table, but sometimes on a notepad in a faculty meeting, or right before the first bell.

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“Poison Damsels in Rajaji’s Harem, 1673” by Tara Isabel Zambrano | TTR 4.1

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Tara Isabel Zambrano works as a semiconductor chip designer in a startup. Her work has been published in Tin House Online, The Southampton Review, Slice, Bat City Review, Yemassee, and others. She is Assistant Flash Fiction Editor at Newfound.org and reads prose for The Common. Tara moved from India to the United States two decades ago and holds an instrument rating for single engine aircraft. She lives in Texas.

 

What is the best piece of writing advice you have received? 

Write naked. That means to write what you would never say.

Write in blood. As if ink is so precious you can’t waste it.

Write in exile, as if you are never going to get home again, and you have to call back every detail.

—Denis Johnson’s “Three Rules To Write By”

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We wish the best of luck to each of these writers!

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