Craft Talk

Meet Our Best Small Fictions Nominees

We at The Tishman Review are pleased to announce our nominees for the 2019 Best Small Fictions anthology. We are so proud of all our contributors. Keep reading to meet this year’s nominees!

“A Sentinel in the Plains” by Jackie Aleksandrovich |TTR 4.3

JackieAlexanderYannJackie Aleksandrovich lives, writes, and will likely die out in the Northwest. A handful of their work has been published in Thin Air Magazine, OROBORO, and Foglifter Journal.




What is the best piece of writing advice you have received?

The writing advice I’ve found to be most useful is just write, write often. Write as often as you think you possibly can, even the most minute and fleeting thought, see to it that it’s written. Write even if what you think you’re writing is garbage. Just keep writing. You’ll get better.

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“Warp and Weft by Deborah Elderhorst | TTR 4.2

DeborahElderhorst

Deborah Elderhorst is an Australian-Canadian writer of literary fiction and creative nonfiction. Her work has appeared in the anthology Trace (Clover Press-Visible Ink, Australia) and in the New Zealand journal Phantom Billstickers Café Reader. She was a finalist in the Writers’ Union of Canada 25th Annual Short Prose Competition for Emerging Writers and received an honorable mention in the 44th New Millennium Writing Awards. Deborah lives in Toronto, where she works as an editor.

What do you do to overcome writer’s block?

Crossing over from fiction into hybrid forms of nonfiction—lyrical essays, prose poems, visual essays—afforded me a creative jolt when I felt stuck on a project. In granting myself permission to experiment with forms that were new to me, I recovered that sense of playfulness and excitement about writing that often yields the best and most surprising results. I felt like an alchemist. Far from turning me away from fiction permanently, this gave me new energy for my stalled project.

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“In My Pocket” by Seth D. Slater | TTR 4.1

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Seth D. Slater has contributed to the Chicago Quarterly ReviewNew Madrid: Journal of Contemporary LiteratureMetonymLe Scat Noir, and The Tishman Review. Slater was a recent AWP finalist for best novel excerpt and teaches Writing and Rhetoric at San Diego State University.


What does your writing process look like?

There’s nothing like forward motion. I pace or drive my stories into existence, the spirit translating asphalt miles or circled-steps into motion outside myself. After I get the gist, after I tread a cerebral rut that feels out my trajectory of thought, I sit down at my desk and drink heavily-sugared coffee (because I don’t have enough cavities) and I blast music that hand-holds my current tempo of thought.


“And We Who Never Died” by Desmond White |TTR 4.2

Desmond_WhiteDesmond White’s satire and speculative fiction has appeared in HeartWoodGhost ParachuteWhatever Our SoulsRue ScribeInk & VoicesKasmaThe Tishman Review, and others. His piece “House Divided” was recently featured in Z Publishing’s America’s Emerging Writers. A native of California, Des has lived in Indonesia, Venezuela, China, and the “independent Republic” of Texas. He has an MLA from Houston Baptist University, where he founded the student magazine Writ in Water. These days he teaches high school in Colorado and runs a flash-fiction-focused website called Rune Bear. See more at www.desmondwrite.com or @desmondwrite.

Where or what time of day do you write best?

Famously, Ernest Hemingway wrote in the morning from “first light” to noon. For those of us who work the 9 to 5 (as a teacher, 7 to 3), Hemingway might not inspire so much as demotivate. Coming home from a day’s work, with kids and cats and bills, and the brain completely oatmeal—who has the time for anything?

Instead, I draw inspiration from Terry Pratchett, who dreamed of story at work, and wrote four hundred words at home. Every day. Until he finished his novel. So where or when do I find the time? Wherever. Whenever. But I write every day, hopefully at my dining room table, but sometimes on a notepad in a faculty meeting, or right before the first bell.

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“Poison Damsels in Rajaji’s Harem, 1673” by Tara Isabel Zambrano | TTR 4.1

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Tara Isabel Zambrano works as a semiconductor chip designer in a startup. Her work has been published in Tin House Online, The Southampton Review, Slice, Bat City Review, Yemassee, and others. She is Assistant Flash Fiction Editor at Newfound.org and reads prose for The Common. Tara moved from India to the United States two decades ago and holds an instrument rating for single engine aircraft. She lives in Texas.

 

What is the best piece of writing advice you have received? 

Write naked. That means to write what you would never say.

Write in blood. As if ink is so precious you can’t waste it.

Write in exile, as if you are never going to get home again, and you have to call back every detail.

—Denis Johnson’s “Three Rules To Write By”

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We wish the best of luck to each of these writers!

Tips to Help Your Short Story Succeed at TTR

Tips to help you succeed with your short story at TTR:
1. If a story has been declined without a request for revision, please do not send it again, even if it has been a number of years. Submittable has a button to click on that pulls up, in seconds, all of the submissions by any one author. Inevitably, one of us remembers the story.
2. We are currently not interested in stories that focus on the POV of a male who is afflicted with toxic masculinity. We’re not interested in spending time inside this type of person’s head. However, a story in which toxic males are present and there is pushback against this attitude and behavior will be considered. A fine example of this is the 2018 winner of the Tillie Olsen Short Story Award, which you can read on our website.
3. We are not interested in stories that are not cognizant of language when referencing American Indians and are not truly authentic to their experiences. Comparing American Indians to animals (even if trying to elucidate the government’s racist policies), writing about their spiritual or religious beliefs or cultural practices when you have only researched this from afar, writing in their POV and when the character becomes violent saying something like it is their “Indian blood” coming out, and so forth, are big no-no’s at TTR. Some stories told by American Indians are considered sacred to them and not to be shared outside the tribe. If you are non-indigenous and have worked hard to be authentic (and not just by reading books written by white people) and have vetted your story with a number of important people within the tribe you are writing about (if you are writing about the tribe’s cultural and spiritual practices and beliefs), please feel free to send it.
4. See number two but insert a racist or homophobic POV.
5. Please do not send angry, defiant, defensive, demeaning, rude cover letters. If you don’t like our submission guidelines or our hard work to be inclusive to all peoples, send your story somewhere else.
6. We won’t publish you story if there is objectification of women within it. This is when the story focuses on women’s physical attractiveness and describes women according to how a male judges their body and appearance. Sometimes these narratives will compare women to animals. In these stories, often the male characters are then described according to their character and personality traits but not their physical appearance. Sometimes the main character is not the stereotypical toxic male, but this objectification sneaks into the narrative. See number two about toxic masculinity and the need for pushback against this.
7. Sometimes we still see stories where the characters are stereotypes. Don’t send those.
8. Make sure your main character has a problem or dilemma they need to try and resolve in the story. This makes your story interesting and engaging. We aren’t interested in pieces that are just descriptions of someone’s life. The short story is an art form and all readers expect writers to honor this form, no matter how experimental the work, no matter how young the reader or modern the reader or old the reader. The number one complaint amongst readers from all walks of life that have been staff at TTR is lack of narrative arc. Make sure the character’s problem becomes apparent to some degree by page 2. This is called “tension.” A narrative arc is what makes a piece, a short story. How this is done is open to an enormous amount of leeway. Read William Maxwell’s short story “The Thistles in Sweden” which is seemingly about nothing, but is in fact, a short story.
9. If you send us fantasy, science fiction, or historical fiction, please make sure the story is focused on character development rather than plot. For historical fiction, please be cognizant of language.
10. Do not front load your story with exposition and backstory. Start your story as soon as possible to when the tension (see above) enters the character’s life.
11. The stories we publish at TTR have what we consider to be substance. Substance makes us respond either emotionally or intellectually or both. Substance has weight, even in humor.
12. Be careful not to send us stories that are for children. We get a surprising number of good stories that are suited to children and teenagers and not adults. The focus in the story is only on what children concern themselves with. While important to children or teenagers, the concerns are boring to adults. This is a tricky balance. But see “The Gun Rack” by WA Polf in TTR October 2016 and “The Cigarette Thieves” by Renee Macalino Rutledge in TTR April 2017 for examples of a main character that is a child, but the story appeals to adult readers. Also, Flannery O’Connor’s “The Lame Shall Enter First” and Edward P. Jones’s short stories often have juvenile characters but are written for adults. Maybe one way to analyze this is to think about how shallow the story is; the more shallow the less likey to engage an adult.
13. Did we say character, character, character? Fleshy and whole. Alive on the page.
14. We do care about language usage at the sentence-level. Prose that appears wrought with the need for line edits will be declined. Numerous typos and grammatical errors are off-putting.
15. Finally, make sure your story knows what it is about. Is it a victim of thematic hoarding? Our heads are spinning. Does it need a spring cleaning? Too much clutter with plot lines, characters, themes, makes for a messy story that still reads as if it doesn’t know why it exists yet. Take the time to find out. The shorter the story, the tighter the focus.
16. These recommendations are very specific to TTR. There are lots of journals publishing fabulous stories and they may or may not disagree with us entirely or in certain areas. This makes for a thriving, committed, and passionate literary world. Seek out the publishers and editors who will appreciate your stories.

Meet our 2018 Best of the Net Fiction Nominees

Welcome to the second installment of our Best of the Net recognition series featuring our 2018 nominees. In this post, we are spotlighting our choices for the fiction category. It is with great pleasure that we nominate the following contributors to be considered for Sundress Publication‘s 2018 Best of the Net anthology.

Lee Kvern, “Sangfroid in Two Movements” in TTR 3.3

10527414_10153040274761164_50703296624167825_nLee Kvern is the Canadian award-winning author of short stories and novels. Her short stories in recent collection 7 Ways To Sunday have garnered the national CBC Literary Award, Western Magazine Award, Hazel Hilles Memorial Short Fiction Prize, and the Howard ‘O’ Hagan Award.  Afterall was selected for Canada Reads (Regional), and nominated for Alberta Books Awards. The Matter of Sylvie was nominated for Alberta Book Awards and the Ottawa Relit Award. Her work has been produced for CBC Radio, published in Event, Descant, Air Canada enRoute, The Tishman ReviewsubTerrain, and Globe&Mail.

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Grace Singh Smith, “Oshini” in TTR 3.3

Grace-Singh-Smith-for_AGNIGrace Singh Smith’s fiction and nonfiction is forthcoming or has appeared in AGNI, Santa Monica Review, Cleaver, Aster(ix), The Texas Review, and The Tishman Review. Her short story “Oshini” was a semi-finalist and special mention for the Tillie Olsen Short Story Award 2017 (The Tishman Review) and her short story “The Promotion” was cited as Notable in Best American Short Stories 2016. A native of Assam, India, she now lives in Santa Monica with her husband and handsome editorial support animal, a yellow lab named Samson. Grace holds an MFA from the Bennington Writing Seminars and, in another life, is the spokesperson for Santa Monica College. She is finishing (!) her first novel Goddess of Spiders.

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Meet our Best of the Net 2018 CNF Nominees

It’s that time of the year again—time for us to name our nominees for Sundress Publication’s annual Best of the Net anthology! We are deeply enamored with every single piece that we print, so the process of selecting our nominees is never easy. However, after great deliberation, it is with immense pleasure that we nominate the following contributors to be considered for the 2018 Best of the Net.

Rashaun J. Allen, “Level Four” in TTR 3.3

170503_Allen Rashaun_001Rashaun J. Allen, a current Vermont Studio Center Resident, holds an MFA in Creative Writing and Literature from SUNY Stony Brook where he was a twice recipient of the Southampton Graduate Arts Excellence in Service Award and the first Fulbright scholar in the program’s history. He has independently published poetry chapbooks: A Walk Through Brooklyn and In The Moment that became Top 10th and 11th Amazon Best Sellers in African American Poetry. He has been published in TSR: The Southampton Review, The Tishman Review, Rigorous, Auburn Avenue and Poui. He also has a Steinberg Essay Contest Finalist forthcoming in Fourth Genre. When not writing or thinking about writing, he runs just to cross the finish line screaming. Find more of his work at www.rashaunjallen.com.

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Kelly Grogan, “Murmurations” in TTR 4.1

KGrogan_AuthorPhotoKelly Grogan received her MFA from Antioch University, Los Angeles with a grant from the Elizabeth George
Foundation. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in New Plains Review, The Forge, Blue Earth Review, and Reed Magazine, among others, and was shortlisted for the Iowa Review Fiction Award. Kelly founded and hosts Out Loud, a literary reading series in Santa Barbara, and is currently working on a novel and an essay collection.

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Meet our Best of the Net 2018 Poetry Nominees

Welcome to the third and final installment of our Best of the Net recognition series featuring our 2018 nominees. Without further ado, meet the poetry contributors we have selected to be considered for Sundress Publication‘s 2018 Best of the Net anthology.

Marion Starling Boyer,“Alfie, the Ransacker” in TTR 3.4

Marion Starling BoyerMarion Starling Boyer is a poet and essayist. Her poetry book, The Clock of the Long Now by Mayapple Press, was nominated for the Pushcart Award and the Lenore Marshall Award. She has also published two other poetry collections: Composing the Rain, winner of Grayson Books chapbook competition, and Green by Finishing Line Press. Her poems and essays have appeared in journals and anthologies including: The Tishman Review, River Teeth, Crab Orchard Review, The Atlanta Review, Hayden’s Ferry Review, Rhino, Spoon River Poetry Review, Folio, South Carolina Review, Asimov’s Science Fiction, and The Midwest Quarterly. Marion has just completed a full-length collection of poems about the quirky Norfolk region of England where she recently discovered her ancestors have lived for generations. A visit to Norfolk inspired a poetry manuscript entitled The Sea Was Never Far. “Alfie, the Ransacker” is one of the characters from this collection.

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Cheryl Buchanan, “Sarasota Bay Night Song,” TTR 3.3

Poet Photo 2Cheryl Buchanan, a co-founder of Writers Without Margins, is an attorney who learned the power of storytelling and silence-breaking when she worked for a decade on over 500 cases of childhood sexual abuse. She earned her MFA where she taught at Emerson College. Cheryl has been the recipient of the Academy of American Poets Prize, the Boston Mayor’s Poetry Prize and the Naugatuck River Review Narrative Poetry Award as well as nominated for a 2016 Pushcart Prize and twice for Best New Poets.  She is the recipient of the 2018 National Association for Poetry Therapy’s Social Justice Award and a producer of the 2019 documentary, In Their Shoes: Unheard Stories of Reentry and Recovery.

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Willa Carroll, “Lamentation Street,” TTR 4.2

Willa Carroll-AuthorWilla Carroll is the author of Nerve Chorus (The Word Works, September 2018). A finalist for The Georgia Poetry Prize, she was the winner of Narrative Magazine’s Third Annual Poetry Contest and Tupelo Quarterly’s TQ7 Poetry Prize. Her poems have appeared in AGNIConsequence, Green Mountains Review, LARB Quarterly Journal, The Rumpus, Tin House, and elsewhere. Carroll holds an MFA from Bennington Writing Seminars. A former experimental dancer and actor, she has collaborated with numerous performers and artists, including text-based projects with her filmmaker husband. Video readings are featured in Narrative Outloud. She lives in New York City.

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Jed Myers, “Smithed on the Anvil,” TTR 4.1

Photo Credit: Alina Rios
Photo Credit: Alina Rios

Jed Myers, this year’s recipient of the Edna St. Vincent Millay Poetry Prize, lives in Seattle where he’s a psychiatrist with a therapy practice and teaches at the University of Washington. He is author of Watching the Perseids (Sacramento Poetry Center Book Award), The Marriage of Space and Time (MoonPath Press, forthcoming), and three chapbooks, including Dark’s Channels, chosen by Tyehimba Jess for this year’s Iron Horse Literary Review Chapbook Award. Other recent recognitions include the Prime Number Magazine Award for Poetry and The Southeast Review’s Gearhart Poetry Prize. Recent poems can be found in Rattle, Poetry Northwest, The American Journal of Poetry, Southern Poetry Review, The Greensboro Review, Terrain.org, Valparaiso Poetry Review, Solstice, and elsewhere. Jed is Poetry Editor for the journal Bracken.

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Cait Weiss Orcutt, “Spike, Javelin, Harpoon,” TTR 3.4

Cait Weiss OrcuttCait Weiss Orcutt’s work has appeared in Boston ReviewChautauquaFIELD, and others. She has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and Best New Poets 2016. Her poems were nominated for a Pushcart Prize and Best New Poets 2016, and her manuscript VALLEYSPEAK (Zone 3, 2017) won Zone 3 Press’s 2016 First Book Award, judged by Douglas Kearney. Cait has an MFA from The Ohio State and is pursuing her Ph.D. in Poetry from the University of Houston. She consults on manuscripts with Tell Tell Poetry and teaches creative writing at University of Houston, Grackle and Grackle, the Houston Flood Museum, the Jewish Community Center, Inprint, the Menil Collection, the Salvation Army, and Writers in the Schools. Cait is the recipient of an Inprint C. Glenn Cambor/MD Anderson Foundation Fellowship and is currently working on a disconcerting collection of tarot poems tackling whiteness, muderino culture, and the 24/7 news cycle. She lives in Houston with her husband Jimmy and her two rescue cats, Nib and Truckboat.

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Valleyspeak | Zone 3 Press
Review | The Bind
Review | American Literary Review
Interview | The Sonora Review
Frontier” | Boston Review
The Prophets” | FIELD
To the Loch Ness” | Hobart
Lineage” | JUKED
Hallows,” “Reseda,” “What Blooms” | Prelude
Vanderbilts” | Tupelo Quarterly
Northridge” and “Ode to the Golden” | Two Peach

Julia Wendell, “First Tomato,” TTR 4.1 

 

julia 6Julia Wendell’s most recent book of poems is Take This Spoon (Main Street Rag Press, 2014). A Yaddo and Breadloaf Fellow, she is the author of several other poetry books, as well as a memoir, Finding My Distance (Galileo Books, 2009). Her new memoir, Come to the X, will be published by Galileo Books in 2019. Several of her most recent video poems that combine poetry, piano, and video have been published by Real Pants and Free State Review. She is an International three-day event rider and currently lives in Aiken, South Carolina.

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And the Winner is …

And the winners are ...

Our Top Ten for the Tillie Olsen Short Story Award 2018

Congratulations to the following authors for making the TOP TEN in the 2018 Tillie Olsen Short Story Award! One of these semi-finalists will be named the winner.

  1. Earth by Vanessa Garcia
  2. The Valley of Death by Jeannette Garrett
  3. Kitty Love by Ann Kammerer
  4. With the Sparrow by Mimi Kawahara
  5. night out by Kay Lin
  6. A Matter of Rocks by Judith McKenzie
  7. A set of distances by Rachael Mead
  8. Attention by Marianne Rogoff
  9. An Altar of Skins by Jeremy Schnotala
  10. Rehabilitation by Julie Zuckerman

 

Tillie Olsen Short Story Award 2018 Top Twenty Semi-Finalists

Congratulations to the following authors for being one of twenty semi-finalists for this year’s Tillie Olsen Short Story Award contest. The Tishman Review received over 275 entries, so making it to the Top Twenty is no small accomplishment. Some of these stories will move on to the Top Ten and one of these stories will be named the Winner. Stories are listed in alphabetical order of author surname. Stay tuned for more!

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  • Our Red Fish by Christopher Amato
  • Snow Rose Thick Where It Met the Ice by Corey Campbell
  • You’re Here Now by Lisa Cupolo
  • Outrageous Fortune by Dwight Curtis
  • The Marchioness by Corey Flintoff
  • Earth by Vanessa Garcia
  • The Valley of Death by Jeannette Garrett
  • Panic by Pamela Hartmann
  • Kitty Love by Ann Kammerer
  • With the Sparrow by Mimi Kawahara
  • night out by Kay Lin
  • El Tigre by Susan Lowell
  • A Matter of Rocks by Judith McKenzie
  • A set of distances by Rachael Mead
  • The Zeru by James Musgrave
  • Tin’s Story by Wendy Riley
  • Attention by Marianne Rogoff
  • An Altar of Skins by Jeremy Schnotala
  • Weekly Maintenance by Sonal Sher
  • Rehabilitation by Julie Zuckerman

 

A Review of Heather Dobbins’s “River Mouth”

by Elijah Burrell

In the “Notes” section near the back of River Mouth (Kelsay Books, 2017), Heather Dobbins’s newest book of poems, she admits she is “no historian.” She goes on to say, “[I] surely got some things wrong for the music of poetry.” The poems in River Mouth move with astonishing speed from one singular voice to the next. These are the voices of those who populated the Mississippi Delta from 1880–1930, whose history and river culture have all but vanished. These poems speak from the minds and mouths of Dobbins’s deckhands, river pilots, shanty preachers, and sharecroppers. The poems communicate desire, loss and hurt, and preternatural music in a way that never feels less than caring and genuine. These are lives off-the-record, long lost but striking.

Dobbins calls forth authentic diction from the period and the people. It feels unfeigned and unforced. In some cases, readers might have to read a line several times just to get at what the speaker is saying, but that is only because it feels so natural. It is as if Dobbins had piloted those boats, walked those sandbars, and worked the levee camps herself. The poems are terse and minimal, yet bursting with interesting language and an abundance of bygone phrases and idioms. In “River Mouth Blues,” the showboat piano man says:

 

When a song chooses me, my eyes get wet.

When I have one to play for, I can remember enough

to feel. Not hear the crowd, ruining pitch and harmony,

sidestepping into my shoulder. One who can shut up

his world for an evening, nevermind the talk

all around us. The one doesn’t let my glass get empty.

 

Dobbins’s speakers are irresistibly strange. Many of them are named in the titles of River Mouth’s five sections. These speakers—and the various characters in each section—assume the same traits as the river governing their lives. A river’s mouth is found where one river flows into another body of water. Such mouths are full of debris and sediment because of the constant turmoil and movement of the water. Like the water, River Mouth’s speakers must navigate their own inner detritus. In the fourth section, “The Alligator God and the River Ghosts,” Dobbins’s lines swing in all directions, surging left to right on the page, the spirits in the poems moving over the face of the waters. These forms provide implicit instructions on how we might read and understand the poems they construct. In “River Ghost Queens,” a poem that winds between the aforementioned swinging lines, couplets, and myriad other “regular” patterns, Dobbins writes:

 

Every body pours from a gutter,

goes somewhere she’s needed more—

a redirected mouth. I didn’t tell on him.

Only way to take river is in gulps.

 

At one point “In Three Days Time,” the sharecropper’s daughter tells the reader, “All life in the water trusts its home. / The river’s only promise is it will disobey.” The speakers in River Mouthunderstand this difficult truth, and they wander through these poems disillusioned and dazed. In “Don’t Tell Me,” the deckhand explains the river’s journey:

 

When you ask me how long she goes, I’ll teach

you again: The Great River opens in Minnesota,

smaller than my crew cabin. Wisconsin, Iowa, Illinois,

Missouri, Kentucky, and Tennessee.

The river is taken in by Arkansas, Mississippi,

until Louisiana, like fingers into gulf.

 

In “Six-day Eyes,” a poem of flowing anguish and misery, the sharecropper’s daughter teaches us about what she’s seen and made of loss:

 

Beauty has never, not once stayed.

If I have learned anything in fifteen years,

it’s that every mouth is shifting,

every one of you: another Mississippi, unsatisfied.

 

The body—most notably the mouth—is a theme in these poems. In this particular poem, a baby’s mouth drinks in its mother’s milk and cries as the mother who provided it walks away:

 

… Carried down, I dump your seven pounds

and three ounces, turn my back

to what cries out for a mother, count my steps

away from you.

 

In River Mouth, the Mississippi is call-and-response religion. It is provider and killer. The Mississippi is sex. Dobbins’s voices marry the spiritual with the erotic in surprising ways. In “Shantyfolk Dance Floor,” the shanty preacher’s daughter says, “A true river man knows / how to lean, to move with / and against.” Then, the following sestet communicates the glide of something deep and powerful—the sound of a “wet saxophone”—a step to the right and back to the left:”

 

I closed his eyes

with my lips.

Time to call.

Time to respond.

I was current

he could hold.

 

Heather Dobbins reanimates not only these many voices but the life of the old river too. In River Mouth, spirits from this long-ago place are rebirthed to bring forth their testimonies and give an account of their lives to the modern world. Dobbins wrote this book because she worried we are losing history. That is lucky for all of us, because she has found it.¨

Tillie Olsen Short Story Award 2018 Final Judge

The Tishman Review is pleased to announce the final judge of the 2018 Tillie Olsen Short Story Award is the award-winning author Tori Malcangio.

TORI

Tori Malcangio received her journalism degree from Arizona State University and her MFA from Bennington College. She lives with her family in San Diego where, besides writing fiction, she is also a freelance advertising copywriter. Stories are forthcoming or have appeared in: Glimmer Train, ZYZZYVA, The American Literary Review, The Chattahoochee Review, Mississippi Review, AGNI Online, Tampa Review, cream city review, River Styx, Ruminate, Passages North, and more. She is a winner of the William Van Dyke Short Story Prize, The American Literary Review Fiction Prize, and the Waasmode Short Fiction Prize. She was awarded a 2016 Writing by Writers Residency and has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. She hopes to one day find the last line to her novel.

Submissions open February 1 to March 30, 2018