Meet our 2018 Best of the Net Fiction Nominees

Welcome to the second installment of our Best of the Net recognition series featuring our 2018 nominees. In this post, we are spotlighting our choices for the fiction category. It is with great pleasure that we nominate the following contributors to be considered for Sundress Publication‘s 2018 Best of the Net anthology.

Lee Kvern, “Sangfroid in Two Movements” in TTR 3.3

10527414_10153040274761164_50703296624167825_nLee Kvern is the Canadian award-winning author of short stories and novels. Her short stories in recent collection 7 Ways To Sunday have garnered the national CBC Literary Award, Western Magazine Award, Hazel Hilles Memorial Short Fiction Prize, and the Howard ‘O’ Hagan Award.  Afterall was selected for Canada Reads (Regional), and nominated for Alberta Books Awards. The Matter of Sylvie was nominated for Alberta Book Awards and the Ottawa Relit Award. Her work has been produced for CBC Radio, published in Event, Descant, Air Canada enRoute, The Tishman ReviewsubTerrain, and Globe&Mail.

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Grace Singh Smith, “Oshini” in TTR 3.3

Grace-Singh-Smith-for_AGNIGrace Singh Smith’s fiction and nonfiction is forthcoming or has appeared in AGNI, Santa Monica Review, Cleaver, Aster(ix), The Texas Review, and The Tishman Review. Her short story “Oshini” was a semi-finalist and special mention for the Tillie Olsen Short Story Award 2017 (The Tishman Review) and her short story “The Promotion” was cited as Notable in Best American Short Stories 2016. A native of Assam, India, she now lives in Santa Monica with her husband and handsome editorial support animal, a yellow lab named Samson. Grace holds an MFA from the Bennington Writing Seminars and, in another life, is the spokesperson for Santa Monica College. She is finishing (!) her first novel Goddess of Spiders.

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Meet our Best of the Net 2018 CNF Nominees

It’s that time of the year again—time for us to name our nominees for Sundress Publication’s annual Best of the Net anthology! We are deeply enamored with every single piece that we print, so the process of selecting our nominees is never easy. However, after great deliberation, it is with immense pleasure that we nominate the following contributors to be considered for the 2018 Best of the Net.

Rashaun J. Allen, “Level Four” in TTR 3.3

170503_Allen Rashaun_001Rashaun J. Allen, a current Vermont Studio Center Resident, holds an MFA in Creative Writing and Literature from SUNY Stony Brook where he was a twice recipient of the Southampton Graduate Arts Excellence in Service Award and the first Fulbright scholar in the program’s history. He has independently published poetry chapbooks: A Walk Through Brooklyn and In The Moment that became Top 10th and 11th Amazon Best Sellers in African American Poetry. He has been published in TSR: The Southampton Review, The Tishman Review, Rigorous, Auburn Avenue and Poui. He also has a Steinberg Essay Contest Finalist forthcoming in Fourth Genre. When not writing or thinking about writing, he runs just to cross the finish line screaming. Find more of his work at www.rashaunjallen.com.

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Kelly Grogan, “Murmurations” in TTR 4.1

KGrogan_AuthorPhotoKelly Grogan received her MFA from Antioch University, Los Angeles with a grant from the Elizabeth George
Foundation. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in New Plains Review, The Forge, Blue Earth Review, and Reed Magazine, among others, and was shortlisted for the Iowa Review Fiction Award. Kelly founded and hosts Out Loud, a literary reading series in Santa Barbara, and is currently working on a novel and an essay collection.

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Meet our Best of the Net 2018 Poetry Nominees

Welcome to the third and final installment of our Best of the Net recognition series featuring our 2018 nominees. Without further ado, meet the poetry contributors we have selected to be considered for Sundress Publication‘s 2018 Best of the Net anthology.

Marion Starling Boyer,“Alfie, the Ransacker” in TTR 3.4

Marion Starling BoyerMarion Starling Boyer is a poet and essayist. Her poetry book, The Clock of the Long Now by Mayapple Press, was nominated for the Pushcart Award and the Lenore Marshall Award. She has also published two other poetry collections: Composing the Rain, winner of Grayson Books chapbook competition, and Green by Finishing Line Press. Her poems and essays have appeared in journals and anthologies including: The Tishman Review, River Teeth, Crab Orchard Review, The Atlanta Review, Hayden’s Ferry Review, Rhino, Spoon River Poetry Review, Folio, South Carolina Review, Asimov’s Science Fiction, and The Midwest Quarterly. Marion has just completed a full-length collection of poems about the quirky Norfolk region of England where she recently discovered her ancestors have lived for generations. A visit to Norfolk inspired a poetry manuscript entitled The Sea Was Never Far. “Alfie, the Ransacker” is one of the characters from this collection.

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Cheryl Buchanan, “Sarasota Bay Night Song,” TTR 3.3

Poet Photo 2Cheryl Buchanan, a co-founder of Writers Without Margins, is an attorney who learned the power of storytelling and silence-breaking when she worked for a decade on over 500 cases of childhood sexual abuse. She earned her MFA where she taught at Emerson College. Cheryl has been the recipient of the Academy of American Poets Prize, the Boston Mayor’s Poetry Prize and the Naugatuck River Review Narrative Poetry Award as well as nominated for a 2016 Pushcart Prize and twice for Best New Poets.  She is the recipient of the 2018 National Association for Poetry Therapy’s Social Justice Award and a producer of the 2019 documentary, In Their Shoes: Unheard Stories of Reentry and Recovery.

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Willa Carroll, “Lamentation Street,” TTR 4.2

Willa Carroll-AuthorWilla Carroll is the author of Nerve Chorus (The Word Works, September 2018). A finalist for The Georgia Poetry Prize, she was the winner of Narrative Magazine’s Third Annual Poetry Contest and Tupelo Quarterly’s TQ7 Poetry Prize. Her poems have appeared in AGNIConsequence, Green Mountains Review, LARB Quarterly Journal, The Rumpus, Tin House, and elsewhere. Carroll holds an MFA from Bennington Writing Seminars. A former experimental dancer and actor, she has collaborated with numerous performers and artists, including text-based projects with her filmmaker husband. Video readings are featured in Narrative Outloud. She lives in New York City.

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Jed Myers, “Smithed on the Anvil,” TTR 4.1

Photo Credit: Alina Rios
Photo Credit: Alina Rios

Jed Myers, this year’s recipient of the Edna St. Vincent Millay Poetry Prize, lives in Seattle where he’s a psychiatrist with a therapy practice and teaches at the University of Washington. He is author of Watching the Perseids (Sacramento Poetry Center Book Award), The Marriage of Space and Time (MoonPath Press, forthcoming), and three chapbooks, including Dark’s Channels, chosen by Tyehimba Jess for this year’s Iron Horse Literary Review Chapbook Award. Other recent recognitions include the Prime Number Magazine Award for Poetry and The Southeast Review’s Gearhart Poetry Prize. Recent poems can be found in Rattle, Poetry Northwest, The American Journal of Poetry, Southern Poetry Review, The Greensboro Review, Terrain.org, Valparaiso Poetry Review, Solstice, and elsewhere. Jed is Poetry Editor for the journal Bracken.

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Cait Weiss Orcutt, “Spike, Javelin, Harpoon,” TTR 3.4

Cait Weiss OrcuttCait Weiss Orcutt’s work has appeared in Boston ReviewChautauquaFIELD, and others. She has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and Best New Poets 2016. Her poems were nominated for a Pushcart Prize and Best New Poets 2016, and her manuscript VALLEYSPEAK (Zone 3, 2017) won Zone 3 Press’s 2016 First Book Award, judged by Douglas Kearney. Cait has an MFA from The Ohio State and is pursuing her Ph.D. in Poetry from the University of Houston. She consults on manuscripts with Tell Tell Poetry and teaches creative writing at University of Houston, Grackle and Grackle, the Houston Flood Museum, the Jewish Community Center, Inprint, the Menil Collection, the Salvation Army, and Writers in the Schools. Cait is the recipient of an Inprint C. Glenn Cambor/MD Anderson Foundation Fellowship and is currently working on a disconcerting collection of tarot poems tackling whiteness, muderino culture, and the 24/7 news cycle. She lives in Houston with her husband Jimmy and her two rescue cats, Nib and Truckboat.

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Valleyspeak | Zone 3 Press
Review | The Bind
Review | American Literary Review
Interview | The Sonora Review
Frontier” | Boston Review
The Prophets” | FIELD
To the Loch Ness” | Hobart
Lineage” | JUKED
Hallows,” “Reseda,” “What Blooms” | Prelude
Vanderbilts” | Tupelo Quarterly
Northridge” and “Ode to the Golden” | Two Peach

Julia Wendell, “First Tomato,” TTR 4.1 

 

julia 6Julia Wendell’s most recent book of poems is Take This Spoon (Main Street Rag Press, 2014). A Yaddo and Breadloaf Fellow, she is the author of several other poetry books, as well as a memoir, Finding My Distance (Galileo Books, 2009). Her new memoir, Come to the X, will be published by Galileo Books in 2019. Several of her most recent video poems that combine poetry, piano, and video have been published by Real Pants and Free State Review. She is an International three-day event rider and currently lives in Aiken, South Carolina.

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Our Nominations for The Best Small Fictions 2018

We at The Tishman Review are pleased to announce our 2018 nominees for The Best Small Fictions anthology. We believe each of these authors deserves the chance to be featured in this year’s anthology, and we’re excited about their chances!

Keep reading to check out their short fiction pieces and to learn more about these talented writers!

(Bonus: Each author graciously provided a piece of writing advice or information about their writing process, so anyone interested in how they write and work should definitely keep reading!)


“Fall, Environmental Politics, and the Retirement of Vin Scully” by Jack C. Buck | TTR 3.4

16105484_10100904616001168_1855705196812639948_nJack C. Buck lives and teaches in Denver, Colorado. He is the author of the flash fiction collection Deer Michigan. He thanks you for reading his work.    

 


What is one piece of advice you would offer to aspiring writers?
Find a friend who cares about your writing, somebody who roots for you. This will help in those times when it feels as if no one else but yourself is reading anything you’ve written. Although we often write for ourselves, it’s nice to know you have readership, even if it is small in number.
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“Creatures of the Antarctic, in Particular the Giant Sea Spider” by Justin Herrmann | TTR 3.3

Herrmann 3Justin Herrmann is the author of the short fiction collection Highway One, Antarctica (MadHat Press 2014). His stories have appeared in journals including River Styx, Mid-American Review, CutBank, and Fourth River. He has an MFA from University of Alaska Anchorage.

What is one piece of advice you would offer to aspiring writers?
Friends, I aspire to write better stories too. It’s hard work, writing. But keep putting time in. I will too. As far as advice I can offer (I believe this comes more from me paying attention as a reader than having skill as a writer): trust your reader. Hold back enough in your story to allow your reader to use her imagination. Trust her to catch the whispers that lurk just below the surface of your story. This will help her connect with your story, help your story work its way into her heart. 
Have a great year, friends. Write something beautiful. I can’t wait to read it. I believe in you. 
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“Francine Francis” by Joshua Jones | TTR 3.2

Josh JonesJoshua Jones lives in Maryland where he works as an animator. His writing has appeared or is forthcoming in Split Lip Magazine, SmokeLong Quarterly, Fanzine, Necessary FictionJuked, and elsewhere. Find him on Twitter @jnjoneswriter.


What is one piece of advice you would offer to aspiring writers?

While writing is by its nature a solitary endeavor, I’ve found having a writing community to be invaluable. Not only for celebrating successes and commiserating over the inevitable rejection letters, but for reading one another’s early drafts and pushing each of us to refine our craft. I’m grateful to have met (even if only online) some fantastic writers and amazing human beings.

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“What We See” by Denise Howard Long | TTR 3.1

Denise Howard LongDenise Howard Long’s short fiction has appeared in SmokeLong Quarterly, Pithead ChapelThe Evansville ReviewBlue Monday Review, and elsewhere. She has been awarded residencies at Hedgebrook and Dorland Mountain Arts Colony. Her flash fiction chapbook Spoil the Child is forthcoming from Finishing Line Press. Denise lives in Nebraska, with her husband and two sons. You can visit her online at www.denisehlong.com.

What is one piece of advice you would offer to aspiring writers?

One piece of advice I would offer to aspiring writers is to learn what works for you and embrace it. Writing as often as you can is advice that goes without saying, but that can look different for every writer. I used to be really hard on myself because I don’t have a consistent, daily writing routine, which is something I’d convinced myself I needed to be a “real” writer. But all that self-criticism did was wear me down and dampen my spirits. Recognizing what works for me and my life right now gave me the freedom to just embrace it for what it is, even if it’s a slapdash, inconsistent approach sometimes. As long as you keep writing—at whatever pace and rhythm is comfortable and successful for you—you’re a “real” writer (whatever that means).


“Community Service” by Matthew Woodman | TTR 3.3

Matthematthew woodman photow Woodman teaches writing at California State University, Bakersfield and is the founding editor of Rabid Oak. His stories appear in recent issues of OblongThe MothDrunk Monkeys, and Five:2:One, and more of his work can be found by visiting www.matthewwoodman.com or by following him on Twitter @rabidoak1.


What is your writing process like?

My writing process differs with each piece I write. Rarely, a piece will erupt fully-formed, and I manically, maniacally scribble down as much of the vision or idea as I can before it’s gone.  More commonly, I’ll have an idea, begin writing, and then when I have a draft find that those first few paragraphs or lines need to be cut in order to bring the piece into shape; that opening was a means to see the land but wasn’t the land itself.  For “Community Service,” the inspiration was a combination of seeing a work crew cleaning litter from the side of the road, reading about inmate firefighter crews, visiting The Wildlands Conservancy’s Wind Wolves preserve near Bakersfield, and listening to a resilient former student.  The process of writing the story was a bit like that of an accordion: I found myself writing pages, then cutting pages, writing additional pages, then cutting pages.  Earlier drafts included quite a bit of dialogue and further character development, which I later felt distracted from the central theme and character.  As with all my writing, I’m still not sure it’s done.


We wish the best of luck to each of these writers!

Pen/Robert J. Dau Short Story Prize for Emerging Writers 2017 Nominees

We at The Tishman Review are excited to announce our nominees for the  PEN/Robert J. Dau Short Story Prize for Emerging Writers. The prize “recognizes twelve emerging fiction writers each year for their debut short story” and “aims to support the launch of their careers as fiction writers.”

It is always an immense honor to be able to bring a writer’s debut work into the world. We are pleased to recognize these talented emerging writers with our nomination.

Without further ado, meet the 2017 nominees!

Lacey Brummer, nominated for her story “Sunset Orange,” TTR 3.3

Lacey_BrummerLacey Brummer is a Nebraska farm girl currently living, working, and writing in Manhattan, Kansas. She received her B.A. in English from the University of Nebraska at Kearney in 2013. As an undergraduate, she was a three-time winner of the Paul and Clarice Reynolds creative writing scholarship, including one first place and two second place awardsShe received her MA in English from Kansas State University in 2015. Her creative and critical work appeared in student publications at both universities. The short story “Sunset Orange,” which first appeared in The Tishman Reviewwas her first professional publication. 

Emily Everett, nominated for her story “In an Emergency,” TTR. 3.2

IMG_2398 finalEmily Everett studied literature, language, and music at Smith College and University College London. She received her MA from Queen Mary University of London, and studied creative writing at Birkbeck University of London. Her work has appeared recently in The Tishman Review and online for Take Magazine. She is managing editor of The Common in Amherst, Massachusetts.

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Best of the Net 2017 Creative Nonfiction Nominees

In the final installment of our Best of the Net 2017 nominees, we are pleased to nominate the following pieces and writers for their work to be included in the Best of the Net Anthology, a project of Sundress Publications.

Sara Alaica, nominated for her creative nonfiction piece “The Iron Gates” TTR 2.4

015-3494126652-O-Sara Alaica is a citizen of the world and a nomad. Her work focuses on her experiences growing up in Serbia and living abroad in Asia, Europe, and the US. Her work has been featured in Vela and Cleaver, among others, and her first book, Kula, a Serbian-language novel, was published in Belgrade in 2014. She is currently working on her second novel set in Yugoslavia during the 1960s. She blogs at saraalaica.com

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Haili Jones Graff, nominated for her creative nonfiction piece “A Salvage-Yard Reunion” TTR 2.4

HailiJonesGraffHaili Jones Graff is a writer, editor, and performer living in Portland, Oregon. She is a contributor to Bitch magazine, and her more literary writing has appeared in The Notebook: A Progressive Journal for Women & Girls with Rural and Small-Town Roots and online at Luna LunaThe Manifest-Station, and Hip Mama. She also performs with Mortified Portland.

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Best of the Net 2017 Fiction Nominees

We are beyond delighted to nominate the following pieces and writers for their work to be included in the Best of the Net Anthology, a project of Sundress Publications.

René Houtrides, nominated for her fiction piece “The Ride of Her Life” TTR 2.4

Rene HoutridesRené Houtrides was born and raised near Manhattan’s Chinatown and Little Italy. Her stories have appeared in The Georgia Review, New Ohio Review, Crack the Spine Literary Magazine, Mississippi Review, Carve Magazine, and other publications. Her story “Knife, Barn, My Harvey” was included in The Georgia Review’s Spring 2011 retrospective of the finest short stories from the past 25 years, and her story  “Workers in Trees” was included in the print anthology of the best Crack the Spine Literary Magazine stories of 2013. She was a staff writer for the Woodstock Times, and her weekly sports column, for the same newspaper, received a First Place New York Press Association Award. Her personal essays have aired on public radio. Her play Calamity Jane was produced in New York City. She holds an MFA in writing from Bard College and is currently on the faculty of The Juilliard School’s drama division.

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Rick Hoffman, nominated for his fiction piece “Biyanî” TTR 3.2

Rick Hoffman is a high school English teacher. His stage play, The Rocky Road to Dublin, won the Huntington Village Theatre Company’s contest for Long Island playwrights in 2003. He is the author of the novel The Devils That Haunt You, and his short fiction has appeared in The Dead Mule School of Southern Literature and Driftwood Press, where he has also served as a guest editor. His upcoming work is scheduled to appear in the December 2017 issue of Edify Fiction. He lives with his wife and sons on Long Island, where he is writing his second novel.

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Best of the Net 2017 Poetry Nominees

It is our immense pleasure to nominate the following pieces and writers for their work to be included in the Best of the Net Anthology, a project of Sundress Publications.

PARTRIDGE BOSWELL, nominated for his poem “Flying home after the protest” TTR 3.1

Partridge Boswell Mt Battie DSC_0586Recipient of this year’s Edna St. Vincent Millay Poetry Prize for his poem “Flying home after the protest,” Partridge Boswell is the author of Some Far Country, winner of the Grolier Poetry Prize. His poems have recently surfaced in The Gettysburg Review, SalmagundiThe American Poetry ReviewGreen Mountains ReviewHayden’s Ferry Review, and Forklift, Ohio. Co-founder of Bookstock literary festival and the poetry/music group Los Lorcas, he teaches at Burlington Writers Workshop and lives with his family in Vermont.

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LISA MECHAM, nominated for her poem “Trespassing”  TTR 2.3

Lisa Mecham Lisa Mecham writes a little bit of everything and her work has appeared in Amazon’s Day OneCatapult, and The Collapsar, among other publications. She has served as an editor, advisory board member, and reader for various literary magazines, and as a social worker, she writes grants for social justice oriented non-profits.

A Midwesterner at heart, Lisa lives in Los Angeles with her two daughters where she’s finishing a book about mental illness in the suburbs; think: “The Shining” meets “Revolutionary Road.”

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ALYSSE McCANNA, nominated for her poem “It’s Not Like the Movies” TTR 3.1

alysseAlysse Kathleen McCanna is currently pursuing her PhD in English at Oklahoma State University. She is the Associate Editor of Pilgrimage Magazine and received her MFA in Writing and Literature from Bennington College in 2015. Her work has appeared in or is forthcoming from poets.org, Lunch Ticket, Barrow Street, Boulevard, and other journals.

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KYLE ADAMSON, nominated for his poem “Retrograde” TTR 3.2

Kyle_17

Kyle Adamson has an MFA from the Bennington Writing Seminars and a BFA from Hamline University. He is the winner of the AWP Intro to Journals Award in poetry, a Pushcart nominee, and a finalist in the Consequence Poetry Prize. His work can be found in the Water~Stone Review, Alaska Quarterly Review, the Beloit Poetry Journal, and others. He served in the Marine Corps infantry and deployed twice to Iraq. Kyle lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

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ADRIAN POTTER, nominated for his poem “RX for the Blues” TTR 3.1

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Adrian S. Potter writes poetry and short fiction. He is the author of the fiction chapbook Survival Notes (Červená Barva Press, 2008) and winner of the 2010 Southern Illinois Writers Guild Poetry Contest. Some publication credits include North American Review, Jet Fuel Review, Obsidian, and Kansas City Voices. He blogs, sometimes, at http://adrianspotter.com/.

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Adrian S. Potter | Writer Website

KIM NORIEGA, nominated for her poem,Postcard to My Younger Self Beneath the Apple Trees” TTR 3.1

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Kim Noriega is the author of Name Me published by Fortunate Daughter Press. Her poems have appeared in journals and anthologies including: American Life in PoetryParis-Atlantic, and Split Lip.  She was a finalist for the 2016 Edna St. Vincent Millay Poetry Prize, and a semi-finalist for the 2016 James Baker-Hall Memorial Prize in Poetry. Kim grew up in Cleveland, Ohio and still loves apple-blossom showers in spring and Vera’s Bakery at the famous West Side Market for Hungarian nut roll at Christmas. She lives in San Diego where she heads San Diego Public Library’s family literacy program.

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Our Nominees for 2015 Best of the Net

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We at The Tishman Review do not take lightly the privilege of publishing the work of the many great writers who honor us with submissions. Nor are we unlike proud parents when given the opportunity to parade them before you and let their best work shine.

This year, Tishman editors ask you to join with us in a high-five, thumbs-up, pat-on-the-back celebration of these our nominees for Sundress Publications’ 2015 Best of the Net.

Nonfiction:

Nicola Waldron’s “In Syracuse”

Jayne Guertin’s “Devotion”

Fiction:

Ani Kazarian’s “Of Books and Stones”

Lee L. Krecklow’s “The Son of Summer and Eli”

Poetry:

Elizabeth Weaver’s “Communion”

J. Adam Collins’s “To Float”

Liza Allen’s “Numbers”

Matthew Lippman’s “Of Ourselves Completely Naked”

Lisa C. Krueger’s “Agapanthus”

Tom Holmes’s “Arriving at the Upper Jay”